Sunday, April 24, 2011

After years of waiting...

In yet more Radiohead related-news, Amnesiac is officially 10 years old. Damn, that's crazy. I pulled it out of the  CD collection as its been about 3 years since my last listening. At the time it came out I was in Australia, so I bought it there, and remember walking around Sydney listening to it in a still-relevant discman. Happy Jesus Day II.

2 comments:

Huge Larry said...

I'm not sure that I'm ready to throw in the towel and admit that CD is dead as an audio format. Certainly, the days of the discman are long-since over as a viable portable audio device, but what are the long-term prospects, if any, of the audio CD in terms of home and car listening?

I remember when MP3 first hit the scene. I could definitely discern a big quality difference between lower bitrate MP3 files when compared to CD audio. Nowadays the compression algorithms are pretty good, and I'd be hard pressed to notice any difference between a CD and a high-bitrate compressed format. Still, some little voice in my head cries out that it wants a perfect, bit-for-bit representation of the studio master.

I think the logical viewpoint is that there's no reason to increase the bitrate beyond the point at which 99.9% of humans will notice any improvement.

With ever-increasing network bandwidth and cheap disc capacity, I'm sure we'll stabilize on some high-bitrate format.

cyrusfx said...

"I think the logical viewpoint is that there's no reason to increase the bitrate beyond the point at which 99.9% of humans will notice any improvement."

This is arguably captureable in a 44.1 hz 320 kbs mp3. I don't know anybody who can actually tell the difference between that an a WAV, though many like to think they can.

The major pro of the CD is that it is physical and read-only, immune to accidental deletion. (although you can certainly still fuck them up, as evidenced in a previous post)

But future earth civilizations are going to have an equally hard time trying to figure out how to decode the music data whether it be in CD or mp3 format. Unless they also dig up still-functioning sound systems, discmans or mp3 players.